Evox Therapeutics announces launch of strategic collaboration with the University of Oxford

Evox Therapeutics is pleased to announce the launch of a collaboration focused on rare diseases with the University of Oxford’s Oxford-Harrington Rare Disease Centre embedded within the Department of Paediatrics. The collaboration will run over three years and will capitalise on the world-class exosome research environment in Oxford, leveraging exosome therapeutics expertise and resources from both Evox and the University to drive innovation within rare disease drug development.

The Oxford-Harrington Rare Disease Centre – an affiliation between the University of Oxford and Harrington Discovery Institute – is a global leader in cutting-edge rare disease translational research. Through this collaboration, the parties will stimulate and support innovative approaches to identify and develop exosome therapeutics for the treatment of rare diseases. The collaboration also acts as a platform for the acceleration of translational exosome therapeutics research projects and seeks to build a strong cohort of scientists with in-depth knowledge of the exosome drug discovery process from both the academic and industrial perspective.

Dr Antonin de Fougerolles, Chief Executive Officer of Evox, commented: “We are very pleased to be collaborating with a world-class institute like the Oxford-Harrington Rare Disease Centre on exosomes and their application to the treatment of life-threatening rare diseases. In bringing together our expertise, we can maximise the potential of our exciting technology to bring more options to patients struggling with rare diseases.”

Professor Georg Holländer, Department Head of Paediatrics:  “Exosome therapeutics have the potential to significantly alter the landscape of rare disease treatment for the better. We are delighted to have entered into this collaboration with Evox, a leader in the field, to explore this area. We will look to leverage our joint resources and scientific expertise to identify exciting new treatment options.”

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